Trustworthiness

We held our Shared Start program today under the colors and theme of the Olympic Spirit. It is best expressed in the Olympic Creed: “The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well.” The victory of every athlete in the Olympic games is not that they win a medal, but that they have the courage and persistence to be and become the best athlete they can possibly be. They trust their coach, their body, and most importantly, they trust that the time and effort put into their sport will make them a worthy competitor at the games. Trusting in self is essential to success at any level.
Our habit of the week is Trustworthiness. It is true that we ought to be trustworthy to one another and should expect it in return, but there is another important angle to being trustworthy. We must trust ourselves to use the gifts and talents that we are blessed with and to let our natural talents guide us through our day so we can live fully and achieve all we are capable of. Helping our children to develop this inner sense of confidence and courage leads to a personal sense of efficacy that grows the best version of our children. In an article from About Kids Health the author explains some key things we can do to help our children develop self efficacy.
Help your child fail again and fail better.
  • Body: help your child set realistic, short term goals
  • Mind: praise effort, not ability
  • Heart: praise honesty
  • Soul: name your child’s strengths
These are excellent tips for growing great kids! I think that it is as simple as loving our children well. ūüôā
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